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Measuring Relative Humidity In Concrete Flooring – Using Tramex Hygrohood

It’s all relative… humidity   Relative humidity (RH) is the amount of water vapour in the air, expressed as a percentage of the maximum amount that the air could hold at the given temperature; The ratio of the actual water vapour pressure to the saturation vapour pressure. Source: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/relative-humidity Standards of Relative Humidity When it comes to relative humidity, the different standards that are used start to become a minefield! We’ve had a look into a few different standards and have found information on what we think are the most used and popular standards. ASTM F2170-09 = the US standards institute (American Standards for Test & Measurement) and the F2170 relates only to in-situ method of testing. They had the hood method in another standard called F2420 but it was dropped about 2 years ago as the Americans thought the Hood test was not reliable. (Tramex have mentioned that they would tend to agree with them except it is very useful when you cannot drill) This standard has now been updated in 2011 so it is now called the ASTM F2170-11 instead of the 09 version. BS 8203 is the British Standard for resilient floor covering and mentions only the Hood Method instead of the in-situ method. BS 8201 is the Wood Flooring Standard and mentions both the Hood Method and the In-situ method (the 1st British Standard to mention the in-situ method but 8203 is following soon) The problem with the British Standard mentioning the in-situ method is that it specifies a reading of 75% for both tests. It is impossible for both tests to read the same unless...

Rubi Scoring Wheels – Which Size For Porcelain / Ceramics / Stoneware? (For Rubi Manual Tile Cutters)

One of the questions we get asked most by our tiling customers is, ‘Which size scoring wheel do I need to cut porcelain / ceramics / marble, etc.?’ Rubi manual tile cutters allow the use of interchangeable cutting wheels, but it appears less than clear as to which diameter wheel to use and when. The aim of the ideal scoring wheel is to score just once to get the cleanest snap, especially on ceramics. In order to do so you need the most relevant cutter and wheel (not one without the other). We’ve provided a guide below, which aims to make things a lot clearer… 6mm scoring wheels are ideal for ceramic and glazed tiles. They produce a shallow line. Any deeper and it might produce crack marks and can sometimes be prone to chipping the tile. 8mm cutting wheels are good for porcelain and floor tiles because the blade is narrower, giving you a deeper cut, and in doing so it gives you a better chance at snapping it in one go. 10mm scoring wheels are great for ceramic stoneware. Normally these tiles are slightly more textured (even on a minute scale) so the larger wheel doesn’t deviate on any crevices. The tiles are generally still quite polished so, like the 6mm wheel, this gives you a shallow cut, but it’s slightly wider, allowing you to snap stronger material. 18mm+ cutting wheels are for rough ceramics and difficult cuts. They give a deep and wide cut and are great for textured tiles. There is also less deviation and these wheels are normally better suited to scoring multiple times,...

Friday Favourites

What a week it has been! I don’t know about you but I am so glad the weekend is here! To start the weekend off right, take a look at some of our favourites from this week… 1) What can you see? Shiny legs or painted legs? This is still making my eyes hurt!                 2) When a road sign goes wrong… or maybe not? 3) He’s very much defeating the object isn’t he? And of course, nothing finishes a Friday off more than a compilation of construction fails!   Happy Friday...